Can the world become more effective with the gig economy?

While the employee model has been successful over the decades, it is mainly because it is efficient for organizations to achieve most business objectives. It is not particularly effective in unleashing individual employees' passions, creativity and innovative ideas. To unleash the full potential of our societies, we need employment structures allowing more freedom and flexibility.

We want freedom

If you are still not convinced that the gig economy is here to stay, let's briefly recap the history of employment.

A few generations ago, after World War Two, securing a life-long job was considered the normal and wise thing to do. People worked their 8 hours a day, every day, for 30-40 years and then happily retired with enough savings.

As employers started to offer more competitive remuneration and benefits packages to secure the best employees, switching jobs every few years became fashionable. More and more professionals engaged in job hopping, which gave them power over their employers.

For as long as jobs existed, so has presenteeism - the act of physically being at work but not being mentally present, and not being fully productive. Companies found themselves paying for their employees' water cooler time, and later, Facebook time.

The obvious solution was to create stricter control mechanisms to ensure people were getting paid for actually working, not just coming to the office. Organizations introduced strict supervisors, rules and consequences for breaking them, and monitoring and restriction of computer and internet usage. When all of this demotivated employees and increased turnover, we all tried the polar opposite approach - instead of controlling employee's activities to ensure they were doing the right thing, we decided to inspire them to do the right thing. As a result, team building and employee engagement methods gained popularity.

At the end of the day, however, presenteeism is due to lack of freedom for the individual. Whether they have monitored internet usage, or a foosball table and 20% free time for 'innovation', employees do not feel real freedom, because what they are doing is for their company, their employer, and not for themselves. Having to do something over and over again, or on days when you are unmotivated, or work with clients you did not choose - that is what makes traditional jobs historically and widely disliked.

Self-employment became a more and more attractive option. Increasingly independent from a specific company, people began to be valued for who they are - their personality, reputation, and status, rather than how well and fast they could get a task done. The fact that a competent expert completed a particular task became more important in determining their remuneration than how long they spent on it. Commission-based pay became common in some industries, and soon, people chose to leave firms to be independent contractors.

The trend is evident: people want freedom to be individuals, to be valued for who they are, and the independence to pursue their desires.

The gig economy is here to stay, not only because it is more efficient for companies to hire freelancers than employees, but because we are inherently wired to gravitate towards whatever option gives us more freedom.

However, freedom comes at a price.

Controlling the fear

Being an independent professional is scary. With freedom, comes fear.

Hundreds of online platforms emerged to help freelancers manage their fear. Online marketplace platforms give freelancers a framework to find work, advertise their services, and learn from each other. With such a framework, more people were willing and confident to try independent work, as they had a clearer idea of what they should do to succeed.

The 2PS framework gives independent professionals ultimate control over their fear. Their reputation, how many projects they get, the rate they charge - everything is completely in their hands. If one of our members feels that they are not getting enough clients from the network, they have the tools to correct this problem - they can attend M33TUPs to find synergy points, boost their reputation by giving other members clients, and get involved in bigger projects.

Free, effective societies

While the employee model has been successful over the decades, it is mainly because it is efficient for organizations to achieve most business objectives. It is not particularly effective in unleashing individual employees' passions, creativity and innovative ideas.

It is often said that efficiency is doing things right, while effectiveness is doing the right thing. We are going to go ahead and propose that for individuals, the employee model is efficient, and the freelancing gig economy model is effective. The freelancing model allows them to pursue projects they enjoy, are passionate about, and generate excellent outcomes in the meantime.

To build a healthy society with thriving businesses, happy population, and innovation and progress, we need employment structures that are effective for individuals.

We've been successfully managing our industry and businesses to survive, make a profit and succeed. However, we haven't been leading ourselves in the right direction: we haven't put ourselves on the correct path towards a bright and satisfying future for humanity.